Full Throttle: Remastered (PC) PlayThrough

FullThrottle

The full game is up and completed. So please watch and if you like the game hit the LIKE and SUBSCRIBE buttons! Thanks for watching.

Full Throttle is a graphic adventure game developed by LucasArts and designed by Tim Schafer. The game was released on April 20, 1995 for MS-DOS, Microsoft Windows and Mac OS. It was Schafer’s first game as project lead and head writer and designer, after having worked on other LucasArts titles including The Secret of Monkey Island (1990), Monkey Island 2: LeChuck’s Revenge (1991), and Day of the Tentacle (1993). Set in the near future, the game’s story follows Ben, the leader of a biker gang, who is framed for the murder of a beloved motorcycle manufacturing mogul and seeks to clear his and his gang’s names. A remastered version of the game was developed by Double Fine Productions and was released in April 2017 for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4 and PlayStation Vita.

Full Throttle was LucasArts’ eleventh adventure game overall and the tenth to use the company’s in-house game engine, SCUMM. It featured full motion video and action sequences, using LucasArts’ INSANE animation engine, which was previously utilized in Star Wars: Rebel Assault II: The Hidden Empire. It was the first LucasArts game to be released for Microsoft Windows and the first to be distributed only on CD-ROM. It also introduced a contextual pie menu through which the player controls interactions with objects and characters. In contrast to other computer games of the era, which mostly relied on in-house talent for their voice acting, Full Throttle used mostly professional voice actors, including Roy Conrad as Ben, Mark Hamill as the villainous Adrian Ripburger, Hamilton Camp as the elderly Malcolm Corley, and Kath Soucie as Ben’s ally Maureen. It was one of the few LucasArts games to use licensed music, featuring songs by San Francisco-area rock band The Gone Jackals.

Successfully printing PCTPE!

Here it is, my iPhone 6s case designed and printed by JONESIUM DESIGNS. I used the filament PCTPE by Taulman. Its a mixture between nylon and TPE. This results in a very very strong case that is also flexible. You can also dye them any color you want. I will write a short summary of the process from designing to printing shortly.

My PCTPE settings were as follows:

Hot End: 235
Heated Bed: 95
Print Speed: 50mm/s
Resolution: 0.30mm

3D Printer Blues!

So from time to time we come across difficulties pertaining to the functionality of our Anet A8 printer. Well, last night was one of those times.

i just got done with a successful 3 hour print of a cell phone case with some TPU. The next day I go to print with some plain ol’ PLA and I hear clicking from the extruder. I immediately knew there was an extrusion problem. I had the problem before and it was the hotend getting jammed up because the nozzle was too close to the bed causing the filament to squish itself up inside the throat. I also ruled out temperature of the heated bed and the filament because I use the profile I made up in Simplify3D.

So I re-leveled the bed before calibrating my auto level sensor and retried the 20mm cube print. First layer was fine and then on the second layer it jammed up again. I pull the bowden tube out and clear out the squished filament and I noticed the tube was very warm almost hot. I also noticed the filament was half melted as i pulled it out of the tube. I thought oh this is a different issue here.

I knew from research that the tube passes through the heat,  the heat sink has a fan to keep it cool to keep the filament below the melting point before it is pushed through to melt at the nozzle.

My stock fan was slowly dying and was not able to do that. So I replaced the fan and immediately went back to printing.